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20131202
20131210
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
job and millions of others could be on the line. there is a structural change going on in our economy as we speak. joining me now to break it down, former chief economic adviser to president george w. bush and a hoover senior fellow. welcome to the show. you know, every time i see something new, you know, amazon drones delivering a package, i see automated checkout at the cbs on the corner. i think that jobs have disappeared and are going to continue to disappear, and they are not coming back. am i wrong? >> you are not wrong. that is a correct observation, but it is n observation that is not unique to this particular time frame. you mentioned structural change, and there has been a structural change, and structural change has been occurring for a long time. if you go back to the 1950's, we have about 35 percent of our workforce is unionized, and manufacturing for the most part. and then if you look at the numbers, say in 2007 the number that just precedes a recession, we had about the same number of people, 14 million in manufacturing in the 50's, 14 million in manufacturing in 2007
, who are living at home who are trying to get into the economy, get their experience, get that first job. by raising minimum wage there will be fewer jobs for those people trying to begin their life as productive workers? >> i would have to disagree with you. that may have been the model five or six years ago but with sequestration, we lost 8,000 jobs in the district of columbia. we have people that have been making a decent wage, that need to continue making -- melissa: is sequestration cut off jobs at mcdonald's? how do you connect sequestration with people who are making minimum wage at places like mcdonald's and burger joints? those two things don't go together? sequestration didn't cut off money for minimum wage at restaurants? >> that is not absolutely true. you will find all kinds of workers in these fast-food places because the economy has been bad. the bottom line the district of columbia provide for a minimum wage. walmart opened their doors. in fact we were surprised to learn starting wage at walmart is $9.25 per hour, even now. we had great impact. they were talking 8.25
for the economy. melissa: do you have any idea roughly what percentage? because that's all the the complaint in the holiday season, people say there's great seasonal work, and, in fact, in our next segment we're talking about how people can really find jobs this time of year that turn out to be permanent. about how many do you think end up being permanent? >> i don't have a specific number percentage, and some of that will depend on our growth as we move into the year and the economy and demand for our services, but it has been consistent that seasonal positions turn into full-time positions for us for the past several years. melissa: we've seen a huge jump in online shopping. we saw that even this week as, you know, so many stores went out and opened on thanksgiving, and they did everything they could to get more shoppers into brick and mortar stores. black friday weekend. and still the number of shoppers out there and the amount of money they spent on foot, brick and hour tar, went down. do you see the pick beup in shipping? is all that moving online, or are people just shopping less? what
themselves, graduate from school to move on to another job. vibrant economy such as ours needs these kinds of jobs. melissa: right. >> labor unions know this. they know what kind of jobs these are. they also know that the franchisees, simply can't afford to pay $15. it will result in decreased employment and higher prices. you know i -- i'm sorry. melissa: i don't know why he would expect to support a family of six people on his first or second minimum wage job while he is a full-time student. that's not what those jobs are for. you don't expect those people to be trying to support a family. you expect them to be students who are learning a skill, also earning money at same time to be in school, so then they can have a family and be able to support those folks. i don't think the problem is the amount of money that being paid at mcdonald's. think there are other problems in that situation. >> absolutely. and, again, you know, this, emphasizes the fact of what kind of jobs these are. but, melissa, i was going to say, you know the fast-food franchise owners sympathy can't afford to pay $15. t
she will not hesitate. that is the only tool left for stability in the economy and economic growth is you print more money and print more money along with government spending more money. there is a limit to that and that is what i've been saying and i'm sure they can not solve our problems by doing the same thing that created our problem. melissa: congressman, we're out of time. will you come back because i want to talk to you more about that topic. we didn't have enough time on the fed. can you come back and do more with me. >> i will be glad to. melissa: thank you so much. >>> are you in the 20%? new report says one in five will become rich and powerful in our lives and these are people demanding organic groceries, vip lane at airport. does that sound like you? tweet me. tell me what you think. rise of new rich in today's "money talker." "who made money today." one guy made some cash just by taking a nap but it is not as pleasant as it sounds. "piles of money" coming right up reluctant to try new things. really? what's wrong withtrying new? look! mommy's new vacuum! (cat screech)
deserve it off. melissa: out you balance this economy? >> a closed mouth does not get fed. melissa: how do you balance this? any this promotion, this raised why will be looking elsewhere. how do you balance giving them a fair warning because you want to give them the opportunity to give you what you need to advance verses making demands where they're like me know what, i have somebody else. i'm sorry. they call your bluff. a lot of people in that situation. >> it is a tough situation, and you have to add value. you want to make yourself in valuable to the boss. >> i need this by the state. >> i don't think you say i needed by the state. you make it known and lay the groundwork this is what i am willing to do, whatever needs to be done. >> it is a matter of last resort get to the process of proving that you are worthwhile to the boss home throughout the month. again and again you are ignored and passed over, then you put the ultimatum in. >> and you have to be ready to walk. >> you have to be ready. melissa: we will have to do this again. up next, the first installment of testee the halls.
to buy stuff to help the who economy. >> as long as the of foresees their movies are watching tv or to buy their stuff they are fine. john: russell brand known for flicks like forgetting meet sarah marshall had his own tv show was canceled and now he is developing a new show which is owned by fox. what are you thinking, fox? he objects to capitalism solid interview were said whatould you replace i with? to make you talk vaguely about revolution what is it? >> the egalitarian system with the heavy taxation of corporations and massive responsibility for the energy company to exploit the environment. >> they get a little tiny bit of knowledge did it become so watered down socialist dribble and he is the attention horror like the paris hilton of film. john: he once a socialist egalitarian system. >> appeals to people when they are very young and idealistic and passionate and insane which is you are supposed to be but then we grow up and pay taxes. he is not relevant in entertainment so he has to say these things to get injured -- attention. john: what about george lucas? he has made
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)